OII Standards and Specifications List




I'M Europe
OII Home Page
What is OII?
Whats new in OII?
  • Monthly reports
  • Conferences
    OII Fora List
    OII Guides
    OII Index
    OII FAQ
    OII Feedback 
    Disclaimer
    Search Database

  • Character Set Standards

    This section of the OII Standards and Specifications List provides information on character sets that can be used for data interchange. It contains details of:

    * Indicates description revised this month

    Further information on these character sets, and other, proprietary, character sets, can be obtained via FTPfrom ftp://dkuug.dk/i18n/charmaps.all. Part 5 of the Netherlands Ministry of the Interior's series onStandards for the electronic exchange of personal data (ISBN 90-5414-019-4) provides a tutorial on the character set standards and their historical development.

    Information on character set conversion software can be obtained from the TERENA project by contactinghttp://www.nada.kth.se/i18n/c3/.

    The standards in this section have been prepared by both private and public organizations. The following public bodies have been involved in their preparation:

    • ISO/IEC JTC1/SC2 -- JTC1 is the first (and only) Joint Technical Committee of ISO and IEC, and deals with Information Technology. SC2 is the subcommittee of JTC1 which deals with coded character sets
    • ISO/IEC JTC1/SC18 -- SC18 is the subcommittee of JTC1 which deals with Document Processing and Related Communication
    • ITU -- International Telecommunication Union (formerly CCITT: Comité Consultatif Internationale de Téléphones et Télégraphes), Study Group 8
    • CEN/CENELEC -- Joint European Standards Institute, TC 304, Character Set Technology
    • ECMA -- European Computer Manufacturers Association, TC1, Codes
    • EWOS -- European Workshop on Open Systems Study Group on Character Codes
    • TERENA -- Trans-European Research Networks Association Working Group on Character Sets and Internationalization of Networks Services
    • ANSI -- American National Standards Institute
    • JISC -- Japanese Industrial Standards Committee.


    Section Contents
    OII Documents
    OII Index
    OII Help

    ASCII

    Expanded name
    American Standard Code for Information Interchange

    Area covered
    7-bit coded character set for information interchange

    Sponsoring body and standard details
    American National Standards Institute (ANSI)

    Characteristics/description
    Specifies coding of SPACE and a set of 94 characters (letters, digits and punctuation or mathematical symbols) suitable for the interchange of English language documents. Forms the basis for most computer code sets and is the American National Version of ISO/IEC 646.

    Usage (Market segment and penetration)
    Used as the basic US code set for personal and workstation computers.

    Further details available from:
    ANSI, 11 West 42nd Street, New York, NY 10036, USA

    A list of ASCII codes can be obtained via FTP from ftp://dkuug.dk/i18n/charmaps.all/ANSI_X3.4-1968.



    Section Contents
    OII Documents
    OII Index
    OII Help

    EBCDIC

    Expanded name
    Extended Binary Coded Decimal Interchange Code

    Area covered
    8-bit coded character set for information interchange between IBM computers

    Sponsoring body and standard details
    Proprietary standard developed by IBM

    Characteristics/description
    A set of 57 national character sets for interchange of documents between IBM mainframes. Most EBCDIC character sets do not contain all of the characters defined in the ASCII code set but there is a special International Reference Version (IRV) code set that contains all of the characters in ISO/IEC 646 (and, therefore, ASCII).

    Usage (Market segment and penetration)
    Not much used outside of IBM and similar mainframe environments. When transmitting EBCDIC files between systems care needs to be taken to ensure that the systems are set up for the relevant national code set.

    Warning: Unconverted EBCDIC documents can cause trouble if transmitted over the Internet as most of the alphanumeric codes have values greater than 128. (Some Internet nodes can strip the 8th bit off the code and transmit it as the 7-bit stem.)

    Further details available from:
    Your local IBM office

    Details of the most commonly used sets of EBCDIC codes can be obtained via FTP from ftp://dkuug.dk/i18n/charmaps.all.



    Section Contents
    OII Documents
    OII Index
    OII Help

    ISO 646

    Expanded name
    ISO 7-bit coded character set for information interchange

    Area covered
    Unaccented Latin letters, digits and punctuation characters

    Sponsoring body and standard details

    Characteristics/description
    Specifies 7-bit coding for SPACE and 94 characters. There is an International Reference Version (IRV), which is identical to ASCII, and national variants that provide accented and other special characters required in different countries.

    Character positions 00-31 (ISO positions 0/0 to 1/15) and 127 (ISO position 7/15) are reserved for control codes. Code 32 (2/0) identifies a space. The sequence in which other codes appear in the IRV is:

    ! " # $ % & ' ( ) * + , - . / 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 : ; < = > ? @  A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z [ \ ] ^ _ `  a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z { | } ~   

    Usage (Market segment and penetration)
    Base character set used by most systems. Contains all characters provided by the standard shift positions of QWERTY keyboards.

    Further details available from:
    ISO and national standards bodies



    Section Contents
    OII Documents
    OII Index
    OII Help

    ISO 2022

    Expanded name
    Character code structure and extension techniques

    Area covered
    Structure of 7-bit or 8-bit codetables, rules for code extension.

    Sponsoring body and standard details

    Characteristics/description
    ISO standard for switching between code sets in 7-bit and 8-bit environments. Describes the role of the Escape, Shift-Out (SO) and Shift-In (SI) codes in the base control code set for controlling which character sets are used in an 7-bit environment, and how the role of these characters changes in an 8-bit environment to provide a locking shift code swapping function.

    Up to 4 code sets (G0-G3) can be mapped into the left-hand side of an 8-bit ISO code set. Three of these (G1-G3) can also be used on the right-hand side. Escape code sequences are used to identify which code sets are to be used. Users can also select variant control code sequences using Escape code sequences. Escape code sequences are also used to provide a single character change of character sets.

    Usage (Market segment and penetration)
    Forms the basis for code switching in other standards, including SGML, but Shift functions are not used on standard hardware platforms, making use of this standard problematical.

    Further details available from:
    ISO and national standards bodies

    Details of CEN work to define a Minumum set of control functions for Europe can be found in the OII Multimedia and Hypermedia Standards Activity Report, March 1996



    Section Contents
    OII Documents
    OII Index
    OII Help

    ISO 4873

    Expanded name
    8-bit code for information interchange

    Area covered
    Rules for developing 8-bit code sets

    Sponsoring body and standard details

    Characteristics/description
    Standard explaining the structure of 8-bit coded character sets based on the concepts of ISO/IEC 2022. Three levels of implementation are specified, 1 for No Shifts, 2 for Single Shifts, 3 for Locking Shifts.

    Note: ISO 4873 has not been updated to conform to changes made to ISO 2022.

    Usage (Market segment and penetration)
    Provides basic rules for later ISO standards.

    Note: The British Standard Specification for United Kingdom 8-bit data code (BS 6006) is based on ISO 4873.

    Further details available from:
    ISO and national standards bodies



    Section Contents
    OII Documents
    OII Index
    OII Help

    ISO 6429

    Expanded name
    Control functions for coded character sets

    Area covered
    Control codes for 7-bit and 8-bit coded character sets

    Sponsoring body and standard details

    Characteristics/description
    Defines 163 control functions, including the control characters that can be used in the C0 (0/0 - 1/15) positions in 7-bit and 8-bit environments and C1 (8/0 - 9/15) positions in 8-bit environments.

    Usage (Market segment and penetration)
    Forms the basis for control code definitions in many systems.

    Further details available from:
    ISO and national standards bodies



    Section Contents
    OII Documents
    OII Index
    OII Help

    ISO 6937

    Expanded name
    Coded graphic character set for text communication -- Latin alphabet

    Area covered
    Defines characters required for western European languages

    Sponsoring body and standard details

    Characteristics/description
    The left-hand side of this 8-bit code set is the based on ISO 646. The code set for the right-hand set of 94 characters contains a set of diacritical marks that can be combined with letters to produce accented characters, together with other characters used in European languages based on the Latin script that are not suitable for splitting into letter plus diacritic, such as the thorn (þ) used in Icelandic. The set also includes a set of single, double and French style angle open and closing quotation marks, Copyright and Registered symbols, the Spanish inverted question mark, some maths signs, fractions, superior numbers (2 and 3 only) and a set of arrows.

    Usage (Market segment and penetration)
    Basic character set used on teletext, videotext and related systems. CEN/CENELEC ENV 41501 covers its use in videotext services while CEN/CENELEC ENV 41502 covers its use in teletext services. For computers this code set has been superseded by ISO 8859 and ISO 10646. CEN/CENELEC ENV 41503 covers the use of both ISO 6937 and ISO 8859 for the interchange of text and data between information processing systems.

    ISO 6937 also provides the character set repetoire used for X.400 message handling systems and X.500 directory services.

    Further details available from:
    ISO and national standards bodies

    Details of the ISO 6937 code sets can be obtained via FTP from ftp://dkuug.dk/i18n/charmaps.all/ISO_6937-2-ADD.



    Section Contents
    OII Documents
    OII Index
    OII Help

    ISO 8859

    Expanded name
    8-bit single-byte coded graphic character sets

    Area covered
    Defines accented and non-Latin characters used in European languages

    Sponsoring body and standard details

    Characteristics/description
    Specifies coding for sets of accented characters that cover the needs of most European languages, including limited sets of Greek, Hebrew and Arabic characters and some Cyrillic characters. Part 1 covers Western European languages, Part 2 covers Eastern European (Slavic, Albanian, Hungarian and Romanian) languages, Part 3 covers Southern European languages (Maltese) and Esperanto, and Part 4 covers Northern European languages. Part 9 covers characters used for Turkish, replacing those in Part 1 for Icelandic, while Part 10 deals with the Icelandic, Nordic and Baltic character sets.

    Usage (Market segment and penetration)
    Used by a few systems as the underlying code set. ISO 8859-1 is commonly used as the basis of extended 8-bit code sets within the European Community. Mixing of code sets is not permitted so that there are problems when trying to move between environments using different parts of the standard (e.g. Greece where Part 7 is used and the Netherlands, where Part 9 is officially preferred).

    Further details available from:
    ISO and national standards bodies

    Details of the ISO 8859 code sets can be obtained via FTP from ftp://dkuug.dk/i18n/charmaps.all.



    Section Contents
    OII Documents
    OII Index
    OII Help

    ISO 9036

    Expanded name
    Arabic 7-bit coded character set for information interchange

    Area covered
    Defines basic set of Arabic characters

    Sponsoring body and standard details

    • ISO/IEC JTC1/SC2
    • ISO 9036:1987 Information processing -- Arabic 7-bit coded character set for information interchange
    • ISO/DIS 11822: Information and documentation -- Extension of the Arabic alphabet coded character set for bibliographic information interchange

    Characteristics/description
    Defines the stand-alone version of Arabic character in a form that can be used for interchange between computer systems using a 7-bit code set.

    The extension proposed in DIS 11822 are expected to be approved as an ISO standard shortly.

    Usage (Market segment and penetration)
    Unknown

    Further details available from:
    ISO and national standards bodies

    Details of the ISO 6937 code sets can be obtained via FTP from ftp://dkuug.dk/i18n/charmaps.all/ASMO_449.



    Section Contents
    OII Documents
    OII Index
    OII Help

    ISO 9541

    Expanded name
    Font Information Interchange

    Area covered
    Provides mechanism for the interchange of information related to the metrics and drawing of glyphs used to display characters

    Sponsoring body and standard details

    • ISO/IEC JTC1/SC18 WG8
    • ISO 9541:1991 Information technology -- Font information interchange
    • ISO 10036:1996 Information technology -- Font information interchange -- Procedure for registration of font-related object identifiers

    Characteristics/description
    While other standards describe the numeric codes to be assigned to "characters" within a computer, this standard defines how information about the representation of these characters on a screen or a printed sheet should be interchanged. A single coded character can have many different physical representations, depending on the type face (font) being used. Each such representation forms a unique "glyph".

    Part 1 of the standard explains the general architecture of the font information interchange standard. Part 2 defines the metrics used to describe the weight, width, height, etc, of a glyph. Part 3 defines how the information needed to generate a glyph should be interchanged, and defines ASN.1 and SGML interchange formats for this information.

    ISO 9541 has been defined so that metric information can be interchanged separately from the more commercially sensitive glyph generation information. The metrics defined in Part 2 are of relevance to composition and other software that needs to calculate the relative position of glyphs. Only when the characters are actually being displayed/printed does access need to be provided to the much bulkier glyph drawing information. ISO 9541 Type 1 fonts are compatible with Version 23.0 of the Postscript interpreter.

    A register of glyph identifiers is maintained on behalf of the ISO by Association for Font Information Interchange (AFII). This register is based on ISO/IEC 10036.

    Usage (Market segment and penetration)
    Not widely adopted yet as a competitor to the proprietary Truetype and Bitstream font interchange formats. The need for a truly international standard in this field is only just being recognized. It is considered to be of particular importance to the Far East marketplace.

    Further details available from:
    ISO, national standards bodies and Association for Font Information Interchange, 2961 Copa de Oro, Los Alamitos, California 90720, U.S.A. (+1 310 596 4457)

    CEN work to define a Charcter/glyph correspondence for Europe
    OII Multimedia and Hypermedia Standards Activity Report, March 1996
    DIS for Part 4 Application-specific extensions
    Role of OpenType as competitor to ISO 9541
    OII Multimedia and Hypermedia Standards Activity Report, May-June 1996
    An operational model for characters and glyphs (ISO/IEC TR 15285)
    OII Multimedia and Hypermedia Standards Activity Report, September 1996
    Font information interchange for web fonts
    Enhancements to ISO/IEC 9451
    OII Multimedia and Hypermedia Standards Activity Report, August 1997


    Section Contents
    OII Documents
    OII Index
    OII Help

    ISO 10367

    Expanded name
    Standardized coded graphic character sets for use in 8-bit codes

    Area covered
    Defines graphic characters used for general purpose applications in typical office environments.

    Sponsoring body and standard details

    Characteristics/description
    Specifies a unique coded graphic character set for use as the G0 set and a series of coded graphic character sets of up to 96 characters for use as the G1, G2 and G3 sets defined in ISO 4873 when shifting levels 2 or 3 are implemented. It provides a comprehensive repertoire, including all characters from ISO/IEC 6937, 8859 Parts 1-9 and a box character set.

    Registration of character repertoires is carried out using the procedures laid down in ISO/IEC 7350:1991.

    Usage (Market segment and penetration)
    Adopted as national standard in Austria. Uptake elsewhere restricted by limited support for ISO 2022.

    Details of the ISO 10367 character set that allows box drawing characters to be used in conjunction with ISO 8859 can be obtained via FTPfrom ftp://dkuug.dk/i18n/charmaps.all/ISO_10367-BOX.

    Further details available from:
    ISO and national standards bodies



    Section Contents
    OII Documents
    OII Index
    OII Help

    ISO 10538

    Expanded name
    Control functions for text communication

    Area covered
    Control functions required for text in page-image format, and for mixed formatted and formattable text.

    Sponsoring body and standard details

    Characteristics/description
    Describes the role of ISO 6429 control characters when used in page images or in text that has been, or is capable of being, formatted prior to presentation. Applies to text characters only, not graphics. The codes are defined for interchange purposes only: they are not intended for the actual processing of text.

    Usage (Market segment and penetration)
    Unknown

    Further details available from:
    ISO and national standards bodies



    Section Contents
    OII Documents
    OII Index
    OII Help

    ISO 10646

    Expanded name
    Universal Multiple-Octet Coded Character Set (UCS)

    Area covered
    Multilingual character set covering all major trading languages

    Sponsoring body and standard details

    • ISO/IEC JTC1/SC2
    • ISO/IEC 10646-1:1993 Information technology -- Universal Multiple-Octet Coded Character Set (UCS) -- Part 1: Architecture and Basic Multilingual Plane
      • Technical Corrigendum 1:1996 to ISO/IEC 10646-1:1993
      • Amendment 1 to ISO/IEC 10646-1:1993 -- Transformation Format for 16 Planes of Group 00 (UTF-16)
      • Amendment 2 to ISO/IEC 10646-1:1993 -- UCS Transformation Format 8 (UTF-8)
    • ISO/IEC DIS 14755 Information technology -- Input methods to enter characters from the repetoire of ISO/IEC 10646 with a keyboard or other input devices

    Characteristics/description
    Integrates all previous internationally/nationally agreed character sets into a single code set. ISO/IEC 10646 is based on 4 octet (32-bit) coding scheme known as the "canonical form" (UCS-4), but a 2-octet (16-bit) form (UCS-2) is used for the Basic Multilingual Plane (BMP), where octets 1 and 2 are assumed to be 00 00.

    The code set is split into 128 "groups" of "planes" containing 256 "rows" with 256 "cells" for characters. Each character is addressed using multiple octets, the third (first) of which identifies the row containing the character and the fourth (second) its cell number.

    The first 127 characters of the Basic Multilingual Plane (BMP) used for 16-bit code interchange are those of the ISO 646 International Reference Version of ASCII. The characters forming the second half of the first row are those used in ISO/IEC 8859-1, the Latin-1 character set. Other rows provide access to:

    • eastern European accented characters
    • the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA)
    • Greek (including accented characters, "monotoniko" and "polytoniko")
    • Cyrillic, Georgian and Armenian
    • Hebrew
    • all four forms of Arabic characters (initial, medial, final and stand-alone)
    • languages used on the Indian subcontinent (including Devanagari, Bengali, Gurmukhi, Gujarati, Oriya, Tamil, Telugu, Kannada and Malayalam)
    • Thai and Lao
    • Chinese/Japanese/Korean (CJK) ideographic characters (including Hangul, Katakana, Hiragana and Bopomofo)
    • mathematical operators and special character forms
    • box and line drawing characters
    • geometric shapes and Dingbats
    • special OCR characters used on cheques
    • encircled characters and numbers.

    Usage (Market segment and penetration)
    Expected to become the basic coding form for all 16 and 32-bit computer systems during 1997.

    Further details available from:
    ISO and national standards bodies

    Details of the ISO 10646 code set can be obtained via FTP from ftp://dkuug.dk/i18n/ISO_10646. (Warning: This is a large, 81Kb, file.)

    To join the ISO 10646 mailing list send a message consisting of subscribe followed by your e-mail address to listproc@listproc.hcf.jhu.edu

    European subset for ISO 10646-1
    OII Multimedia and Hypermedia Standards Activity Report, March 1996
    Use in Guidelines for preparation of programming language standards
    OII Multimedia and Hypermedia Standards Activity Report, April 1996
    Amendments to ISO 10646
    OII Multimedia and Hypermedia Standards Activity Report, May-June 1996
    International String Ordering
    OII Multimedia and Hypermedia Standards Activity Report, July 1996
    Publication of DIS 14755, Input methods to enter characters from the repetoire of ISO/IEC 10646 with a keyboard or other input devices
    OII Multimedia and Hypermedia Standards Activity Report, August 1996
    An operational model for characters and glyphs (ISO/IEC TR 15285)
    OII Multimedia and Hypermedia Standards Activity Report, September 1996
    Use in MHS addresses
    OII Multimedia and Hypermedia Standards Activity Report, March 1997
    Need to add Euro symbol to ISO 10646
    OII Multimedia and Hypermedia Standards Activity Report, August 1997


    Section Contents
    OII Documents
    OII Index
    OII Help

    JIS X 0201

    Expanded name
    Japanese Industrial Standard Code for Information Interchange

    Area covered
    Interchange of Latin and Katakana characters

    Sponsoring body and standard details

    • JISC - Japanese Industrial Standards Committee
    • JIS X 0201:1976 (reaffirmed 1984) Code for Information Interchange (published in Japanese and English)

    Characteristics/description
    Provides 7-bit and 8-bit code sets for Latin characters (based on ISO 646) and the simple Katakana letters used to aid phonetic interpretaion of Kanji ideograms. (Katakana is used for training Japanese children to read.)

    In 7-bit environments the SO (0/14) and SI (0/15) codes are used to switch from the Latin to the Katakana code set. In 8-bit environments the Katakana characters form the right-hand sector (11/1 to 13/15).

    Usage (Market segment and penetration)
    Used to transfer Japanese information between early Japanese computer systems.

    Further details available from:
    Japanese Industrial Standards Committee, c/o Standards Department, Ministry of International Trade and Industry, 1-3-1 Kasumigaseki, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 100, Japan.

    Details of the JIS X 0201 code set can be obtained via FTP from ftp://dkuug.dk/i18n/charmaps.all/JIS_X0201.



    Section Contents
    OII Documents
    OII Index
    OII Help

    JIS X 0202

    Expanded name
    Extension techniques for use with the Code for Information Interchange

    Area covered
    Switching of Japanese character code sets

    Sponsoring body and standard details

    • JISC - Japanese Industrial Standards Committee
    • JIS X 0202 Extension techniques for use with the Code for Information Interchange (published in Japanese and English)

    Characteristics/description
    Japanese equivalent of ISO 2022.

    Usage (Market segment and penetration)
    Used on 8-bit Japanese word processors to call in multiple character sets.

    Further details available from:
    Japanese Industrial Standards Committee, c/o Standards Department, Ministry of International Trade and Industry, 1-3-1 Kasumigaseki, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 100, Japan.



    Section Contents
    OII Documents
    OII Index
    OII Help

    JIS X 0208/0212

    Expanded name
    Code of the Japanese Graphic Character Set for Information Interchange

    Area covered
    Interchange of Latin, Kanji, Hiragana and Katakana characters

    Sponsoring body and standard details

    • JISC - Japanese Industrial Standards Committee
    • JIS X 0208:1990 Code for the Japanese graphic character set for information interchange (published in Japanese and English)
    • JIS X 0212:1990 Code of the supplementary Japanese graphic character set for information interchange

    Characteristics/description
    Multiplane standard providing access to 6353 Kanji ideographs, 86 Katakana character and sound identifiers, 83 Hiragana character and sound identifiers, 52 Roman, 48 Greek and 66 Cyrillic letters, together with associated numeric, punctuation and line drawing codes.

    Usage (Market segment and penetration)
    Whilst only providing access to a portion of the extensive Japanese ideograph set this standard is used by many Japanese word processing and general computing systems.

    Further details available from:
    Japanese Industrial Standards Committee, c/o Standards Department, Ministry of International Trade and Industry, 1-3-1 Kasumigaseki, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 100, Japan.

    Details of the JIS X 0208 code set can be obtained via FTP from ftp://dkuug.dk/i18n/charmaps.all/JIS_C6226-1983.



    Section Contents
    OII Documents
    OII Index
    OII Help

    OCR

    Expanded name
    Optical Character Recognition

    Area covered
    Coding of machine readable characters

    Sponsoring body and standard details

    • ISO/IEC JTC1/SC2
    • ISO 1073-1:1976 Alphanumeric character sets for optical recognition
      • Part 1: Character set OCR-A -- Shapes and dimensions of the printed image
      • Part 2: Character set OCR-B -- Shapes and dimensions of the printed image
    • JIS X9003:1980 Katakana character set for optical recognition
    • JIS X9005:1979 Handprinted Katakana characters for optical character recognition
    • JIS X9006:1979 Handprinted numerals for optical character recognition
    • JIS X9007:1981 Handprinted alphabets for optical character recognition
    • JIS X9008:1981 Handprinted symbols for optical character recognition
    • JIS X9009:1991 Handprinted Hiragana characters for optical character recognition
    • JIS X9010:1984 Coding of machine readable characters (OCR and MICR)

    Characteristics/description
    Limited characters sets that are designed to be machine readable. OCR-A provides numbers and other characters needed for automated cheque handling. OCR-B allows alphabetic characters to be used in machine-readable data. The Japanese Industrial Standards (JIS) committee has a number of extensions for the recognition of Japanese characters and for the recognition of handwritten numbers, characters and symbols.

    In June 1995 ISO/IEC JTC1/SC2 voted to accept a Turkish proposal to extend the OCR-B character set to include a range of accented and related characters. The new characters include characters suitable for use in Iceland, Greece and Lithuania. 33 new characters and 6 accents will be added by this extension.

    Usage (Market segment and penetration)
    Widely used to enable accurate machine scanning of information.

    Further details available from:
    ISO and national standards bodies

    CEN work to define a European character set
    OII Multimedia and Hypermedia Standards Activity Report, December 1996
    Need to add Euro symbol to OCR-B
    OII Multimedia and Hypermedia Standards Activity Report, August 1997


    Section Contents
    OII Documents
    OII Index
    OII Help

    Other Character Sets

    Expanded name
    Character sets not listed elsewhere

    Area covered
    Machine readable characters for non-European languages

    Sponsoring body and standard details

    • Various national standards bodies
    • CNA GB-2312-89 Code of Chinese ideograms for information interchange -- Basic set
    • CNA GB-7590-87 Code of Chinese ideograms for information interchange -- 4th supplementary set
    • CNA GB-8565-88 Coded character set for text communication
    • CNA GB-12345-90 Code of Chinese ideograms for information interchange -- Supplementary set
    • IS 13194:1991 Indic Script Code for Information Interchange (ISCII)
    • KS C5601-1992 Code for information interchange (Korean)
    • KS C5636-1993 Code for information interchange (Latin characters)
    • KS C5627-1991 Extension code sets for information interchange
    • MS 1362:1983 Jawi character set (Malaysian)
    • TIS 620:1990 Thai character codes for computers

    Characteristics/description
    Character sets whose use is normally specific to one or two countries.

    Usage (Market segment and penetration)
    Used within local markets. Often form the basis of an ISO 10646 code plane.

    Further details available from:
    National standards body



    Section Contents
    OII Documents
    OII Index
    OII Help

    This information set on OII standards is maintained by Martin Bryan of The SGML Centre and Man-Sze Li of IC Focus on behalf of European Commission DGXIII/E.

    File last updated: August 1997

    Home - Gate - Back - Top - Chars - Relevant